Wine Pairing: Strauss Samling and Scampi!

Recently, our own Greg Glunt enjoyed a bottle from his recently purchased case of Strauss Samling 88 2019. It’s his new “spring house white” he says! And it paired beautifully with shrimp scampi with linguini. See the recipe below.  Looks good to the rest of us too!

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Shrimp Scampi with Linguini

Ingredients:

1 pound linguini
4 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 finely diced shallots
2 minced cloves garlic
Pinch red pepper flakes, optional
1 pound shrimp, peeled and de-veined
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup dry white wine
Juice of 1 lemon
1/4 cup finely chopped parsley leaves

1. Place a large pot of water on the stove to boil for the pasta. Once the water has reached a full boil, add some salt and the pasta. Stir. Cook at boil for 7 minutes (pasta will be just shy of al dente). Drain and stir in a little olive oil to keep pasta from sticking together. Cover and set aside.

2. In a large skillet melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium-high heat. Saute shallots, red pepper flakes and garlic until shallots are clear. Season shrimp with salt & pepper and add them to the pan. Cook shrimp until pink then remove and keep warm (I place them in a bowl with a lid). Add lemon juice and wine to the saute pan and bring to boil. Add two tablespoons butter and 1 tablespoon olive oil. Once the butter has melted, add the shrimp, parsley and cooked pasta. Stir together and season to taste. Drizzle with a little olive oil and serve.

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Distinctive and Delicious Malbecs from Mendoza

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Mendoza winemakers are traveling a road to producing wines that reflect soil and place – and do so deliciously!

When Malbec burst on the American wine scene and pushed aside Aussie Shiraz as the best wine value in the USA 10-15 years ago, paying attention to the terroir of various subregions wasn’t on anyone’s mind.

As Uco Valley winemaker Matías Riccitelli told Wine Enthusiast in late 2018, “In the early days, meaning 15 to 20 years ago, the creativity came from outside,” he says. “You had Michel Rolland and his Bordeaux friends at Clos de los Siete, Paul Hobbs [from California] at Cobos, and Hans Vinding-Diers [a Dane] with Noemia down in Patagonia.”

Those outsiders brought with them an “International” understanding of what made for great red wine. And the wines they made – picked at very full ripeness, softened to smoothness, and given a sheen of spice in new oak – very much fit that international mold. And given the then very low land and farming costs in Argentina, they delivered that polished style at stunningly low prices.

A couple of years ago, we began noticing something new in the Malbecs we tried at our buying tastings.

A New Generation. As second and third generation Mendoza-born winery owners took the reins of their estates, they began looking past the international style to try to discover what was unique about their vines, soils, and locations. To be honest, most of those early attempts reminded us why Malbec traditionally plays a supporting role to Cabernet Sauvignon in most of the world.

Today, though, we’re finding more and more examples of Mendoza Malbec that is both distinctively “Mendoza” and utterly delicious. A wine class a few months ago with Sebastian Zuccardi of the Familia Zuccardi Estate provided a fine introduction to the varied terroirs of Mendoza. And, we are also featuring wines from Bodega Andeluna.

Andeluna WineryAndeluna is a great example of an estate working in the Mendoza subregion of Gualtallary that’s made the transition to wines of delicious distinctiveness. Join us on Saturday from noon-4pm and you can taste through their full line-up of current releases with export manager Nicolás Cricco. Like us, we think you’ll be thrilled with the purity of their Chardonnay, the floral complexity of their Torrentes, and the satisfying richness of both their “everyday” Cabernet and the much more serious Malbec Altutud.

But Andeluna’s Malbec Raices is most likely the wine that will stop you cold. Especially when you look at the price – at $9.98 by the bottle, the best you’ll find in the USA. At $7.98/ea by the case?

This wine showcases the unique blend of alluvial, sandy, and limestone-rich soils of Gualtallary. These free-draining soils give bunches of small berries that achieve full ripeness of flavor and tannin at modest alcohols of 13.8%. And when treated with care, they deliver wines that match their fullness and fruit with amazing freshness and superb drinkability. A can’t miss winning four-season, all-purpose red that could be the finest value you’ll find in all of 2020 to come!

Beaujolais Nouveau? – Yup – for Easter!

jean-paul-brun-beaujolais-nouveau-vv-l-ancien_1Here’s a little peek inside the wine business.
Jean Paul Brun’s “regular” bottling of l’Ancien Beaujolias is always a favorite, so when we came to the end of the 2018 vintage recently, we asked Margaret Perry of Williams Corner Wines – home of all things organic, authentic, and sometimes a little weird – to suggest a replacement.
When she recommended the l’Ancien Beaujolais Nouveau I had my doubts. But here, word for word, is how she convinced me to try this:
“From JP Brun Terre Dorées — all we have is the Nouveau — but hear me out! His nouveau is in the exact same wine as the regular Villes Vignes “L’Ancien” — only he bottles this wine right at the end of fermentation, instead of aging it in tanks with the regular cuvee.
 
“At this point, it’s essentially bottle aged, and it is just so damn good. 40-60 year old vines (when do you see that in Nouveau?!); organically grown, hand harvested, rigorously sorted, fermented without carbonic (he calls it the “Burgundian style”). As it happens, I had a bottle in my cellar and opened it up this week. It reminds me of eating Santa Rosa Plums off our tree when I was a kid — and spilling juice everywhere but still reaching for a second one. Warm, sun-ripened fruit (black cherry, tart red plum, black raspberry), nicely lift from the acidity, elegant tannins, it’s lush and refreshing all at once. 
You may still be skeptical, so here’s the deal. If you normally love Beaujolais and/or that description sounds good to you, buy some. If you don’t love it – and I mean go over the moon with eye-rolling delight from first sip to last glug of the upside-down bottle as you struggle to get one more drop into your glass … well, I’ll buy back any unopened bottles from you!
Jean Paul Brun’s Beaujolais Nouveau VV l’Ancien 2019 is decidedly and decisively different from what you may have come to expect from this fading rite of fall. From $14.98 per bottle, this is gloriously delicious, vivid, enlivening, joy- and thanks-producing Gamay that you’ll struggle not to gulp.

Great Vintages, Brilliant Wines at Beaujolais’ Ch Thivin

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Claude Geoffray of Ch Thivin in Burgundy’s Beaujolais

There’s going to be quite an argument about which of the past five vintages is the “greatest ever” in Beaujolais.

Vintage 2014 delivered classic, vibrant, elegant wines that capture the essence of Gamay’s juicy joy. Harvest 2015 added much deeper, riper fruit and more density than usual, but with no loss of energy or minerality. Vintage 2016 brought things back to a more elegant style while 2017 showed more flesh and breadth. And 2018 delivered flesh and body with no loss of vivacity and style.

What will broach no argument is that Ch Thivin made utterly brilliant wines in all five years, continuing to cement their place among the very best in all of Beaujolais – arguably, among the best in Burgundy as a whole.

From 1383 to Today
chateau-thivin-domaine-mont-brouillyThe estate founded in 1383 and purchased by the Geoffray family in 1877. The chateau (yes, there really is one), winery and the estate’s best vineyards perch on the sides of an extinct volcano called Mont Brouilly.

The volcano’s very steep slope – around 40 degrees in the heart of the vineyard – provides excellent drainage, fantastic exposure to the sun, and the platform for the Geoffray family’s modern gravity-flow winery.

Ch Thivin photo of vineyards.jpgThe estate’s best vineyards perch on the sides of an extinct volcano called Mont Brouilly. When others in Beaujolais chased quick and easy cash in the Beaujolais Nouveau boom of the 1970s and 1980s, the Geoffray family just kept on making fine wine. Vineyards are plowed to create healthier soils, no insecticides are used, and grapes are harvested and sorted by hands.

Whole bunches of ripe, juicy Gamay grapes roll by gravity into tanks where fermentation starts naturally with no additions of yeast or enzymes or anything else. After a day, rosé tanks are pressed gently and finish fermentation in stainless steel. Reds soak for a week or so before pressing and racking into large, old, wood casks and bottling six months later. And for these wines, that’s it.

A Kermit Lynch Discovery
Ch Thivin was long well-known as one of Beaujolais’s great estates within France, but pretty much unheard of in the US until the 1970s. That’s when importer Kermit Lynch first visited the Domaine and made it one his earliest imports to the USA. And his description of Ch Thivin today is still the best summing up we can offer. Thivin’s wines, he says, are:

“a country squire who is not afraid to get his boots muddy. Handsome, virile, earthy, and an aristocrat.” – Kermit Lynch

About 98.7% of Wine Drinkers Don’t Do This

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About 98.7% of you don’t drink enough Riesling. At least that’s our unscientific estimate. And we think Austria’s dry but ripe and fruity Riesling is the wine to change that

Ask any Austrian winegrower, sommelier or critic and they’ll be quick to tell you that – as nice as Grüner Veltiner can be – Riesling is Austria’s finest white grape, hands down. And Austrian Riesling is the most delicious and best-value way to get to know the world’s most under-appreciated vine.

Riesling can vary dramatically between regions and countries. German Riesling is either sweet (delicious, but unnerving to American drinkers) or dry and searingly acidic (but in a good way). Alsace Riesling is usually dry, but can feel oily and rich despite the lack of residual sugar. But Austrian Riesling serves up the ripe and generous fruit flavors of the best wines of Germany with the attractive fleshiness of Alsace wines and the crisp, dry, finish of German Trocken bottlings.

Austria’s Wachau
And the best place in Alsace to find these “unicorn” Rieslings is in the Wachau. As Master of Wine Jancis Robinson writes,

“The Wachau in Austria rivals Alsace and the Mosel for the purity of its Rieslings, except that these wonderfully characterful, bone dry, sculpted wines tend to have more in the way of body and alcohol.”

Josef Bauer Riesling FeuersbrunnThat’s a fine description of Josef Bauer Riesling Feuersbrunn 2017, one of the very best wines (red or white!) I tasted during my last visit to Austria in early 2018.

Like all great Riesling, it smells great: aromas of tangerine, fresh peach, lime skin and peach blossom really jump from the glass. In the mouth its flavors of orange, lime, peach and wet stone minerality really drive across your palate, delivering bold flavors without excess weight (it’s just 12.2% alcohol). For all the fruit, there’s nothing “sweet” about this wine, including the long, dry, mouthwatering finish that leaves notes of fruit blossom and fresh lime lingering on and on.

In the hands of a more famous estate – think Prager or Pichler – this would be a $30 Riesling and worth every cent of that. But Joe Bauer is a much more humble guy, more interested in continuing his family’s winegrowing tradition and passing that along to his children than seeking fame and high prices. And our good friend, Klaus Wittauer, gets this to us with minimal mark-ups and add ons so it can sell for a song.

We’d love to get that 98.7% of under-Riesling-drinkers down to, say, 97.2%. So come by this Friday (3-7pm) and Saturday (noon-4pm) (March 15 and 16), and try Josef Bauer Riesling Feuersbrunn 2017 for yourself!

Introducing Lower ABV Wine Selections

Lower ABV SelectionsMore and more often, we hear you ask, “What do you recommend for lower-alcohol reds?” Because while 14.8% Napa Cab and 15% Chateauneuf du Pape certainly has its place, sometimes something a little lighter, fresher, and easier to simply sip appeals.

Of course, you want lower alcohol – not lower levels of quality, satisfaction and deliciousness. Wines like today’s featured Cavalchina Bardolino 2016!

So when we’re tasting and evaluating wines for the store, our first question is, “Does this taste great?” Followed by, “Will our customers love it too?” More and more often, that brings us a range of wines that are full of flavor and delight but a touch lower in heft and alcohol.

So the next time you come into the store, take a look at our shelf tags. Where you see the blue “Lower ABV” emblem, you’ll know the wine is 13.3% or lower alcohol by volume (“ABV”).

Or you can click this link to see our Lower ABV wines online!

Bodegas Borsao: Old Vines, Modern Quality

Bodegas BorsaoSpain’s Bodegas Borsao has been famous for delivering great values from the arid Campo de Borgia region for years. As Robert Parker explained a few years ago,

“This is a marvelous consumer resource for high quality wines selling at absurdly low prices. I often ask myself, if I had known wines like this existed when I began my career 33 years ago, would I have even considered trying to find great wines at low prices? This has been one of my “go-to” wineries for many years, given their relationship between quality and price. Once you taste these wines, you will probably ask the same question many people have – why do I need to spend more?”

The secret to Borsao’s success is a solid commitment by the 620 growers who own the co-op to grow and vinify the best Garnacha (called Grenache in France) in the world.

Small Crops, Intense Ripeness
Borsao windowTheir vineyards are all located on the chalky, stony soils of Campo de Borgia, where lack of rain and searingly hot summers force Garnacha to work hard to produce small crops of intensely ripe berries. Cool nights and old vines keep the ripe fruit balanced with fine acidity and a streak of refreshing minerality.

While the exact blend varies from year to year, the 2017 Borsao is mainly Garnacha – the grape the French named “Grenache” after it landed in the Rhone from Spain centuries ago. There’s usually a splash of Tempranillo and sometimes a dollop of Syrah, all coming from 15-25 year-old head-trained vines. The ripe fruit is fermented and aged entirely in temperature controlled stainless steel to capture the grape’s inherent freshness and vigor.

With Food, On its Own, or at Parties
borsao vineWhat does it taste like? Really, really good and with a touch more concentration, length and freshness than we’ve ever tasted here before. It’s a medium-bodied mouthful of dark cherries, raspberries, violets, and a touch of earthy licorice. There’s enough structure – mouthwatering acidity and fine-grained tannin – to make this a great “food wine” and allow it to blossom further for 2-3 more years.

But it’s round, rich, and just flat-out fun enough to open and enjoy anytime you want a guilt-free glass of red wine deliciousness.

And, if you’re looking for wine for a big party or a wedding, you’ll rest easy knowing that Borsao Garnacha is a crowd pleaser, bold enough for fans of “big reds” but finessed and easy enough for guests who want something lighter and softer. And, when you put it on the table with burgers, pork, lamb, or pretty much anything else, you’ll love how it opens up and complements most any food.

As critic Josh Raynolds said of the 2009 edition of Borsao Garnacha, at the $9 release price, “It sounds like a broken record, but this is another remarkable value from Borsao.” From $6.98/ea by the case, the value can’t be beat!