About 98.7% of Wine Drinkers Don’t Do This

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About 98.7% of you don’t drink enough Riesling. At least that’s our unscientific estimate. And we think Austria’s dry but ripe and fruity Riesling is the wine to change that

Ask any Austrian winegrower, sommelier or critic and they’ll be quick to tell you that – as nice as Grüner Veltiner can be – Riesling is Austria’s finest white grape, hands down. And Austrian Riesling is the most delicious and best-value way to get to know the world’s most under-appreciated vine.

Riesling can vary dramatically between regions and countries. German Riesling is either sweet (delicious, but unnerving to American drinkers) or dry and searingly acidic (but in a good way). Alsace Riesling is usually dry, but can feel oily and rich despite the lack of residual sugar. But Austrian Riesling serves up the ripe and generous fruit flavors of the best wines of Germany with the attractive fleshiness of Alsace wines and the crisp, dry, finish of German Trocken bottlings.

Austria’s Wachau
And the best place in Alsace to find these “unicorn” Rieslings is in the Wachau. As Master of Wine Jancis Robinson writes,

“The Wachau in Austria rivals Alsace and the Mosel for the purity of its Rieslings, except that these wonderfully characterful, bone dry, sculpted wines tend to have more in the way of body and alcohol.”

Josef Bauer Riesling FeuersbrunnThat’s a fine description of Josef Bauer Riesling Feuersbrunn 2017, one of the very best wines (red or white!) I tasted during my last visit to Austria in early 2018.

Like all great Riesling, it smells great: aromas of tangerine, fresh peach, lime skin and peach blossom really jump from the glass. In the mouth its flavors of orange, lime, peach and wet stone minerality really drive across your palate, delivering bold flavors without excess weight (it’s just 12.2% alcohol). For all the fruit, there’s nothing “sweet” about this wine, including the long, dry, mouthwatering finish that leaves notes of fruit blossom and fresh lime lingering on and on.

In the hands of a more famous estate – think Prager or Pichler – this would be a $30 Riesling and worth every cent of that. But Joe Bauer is a much more humble guy, more interested in continuing his family’s winegrowing tradition and passing that along to his children than seeking fame and high prices. And our good friend, Klaus Wittauer, gets this to us with minimal mark-ups and add ons so it can sell for a song.

We’d love to get that 98.7% of under-Riesling-drinkers down to, say, 97.2%. So come by this Friday (3-7pm) and Saturday (noon-4pm) (March 15 and 16), and try Josef Bauer Riesling Feuersbrunn 2017 for yourself!

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