A New AOC for France, and for Plantevin ‘La Daurelle’!

While we love all of Philippe Plantevin’s wines, his special Cotes du Rhone Villages “La Daurelle” cuvee has always been our favorite. But a continuation of Philippe’s skillful winegrowing and winemaking – plus some changes triggered by the elevation of Philippe’s Village of Cairanne to AOC status – come together this year to create the best “La Daurelle” ever!

As you may know, France’s Southern Rhone region has four levels of classification:

  • Cotes du Rhone – a wine from anywhere in the Cotes du Rhone region
  • Cotes du Rhone Villages – a wine from one of the 95 or so hamlets judged to be a cut above the average CdR vineyard land; “La Daurelle” is in this category
  • Cotes du Rhone Villages with Village Name – Like Philippe’s Cotes du Rhone Villages Visan, from one of the 22 or so villages judged to be better still and to have a unique character or style
  • AOC/AOP – A village that stands on its own as one of France’s great terriors; think Lirac, Vacqueyras, Gigondas and – most famous of all – Chateauneuf du Pape.

Elevation from Villages to AOC Means New Name for La Daurelle
plantevin-sainte-cecile-bottle.jpgIn vintage 2016, after years of evaluation and regulatory approvals, the village where Philippe’s home, winery and main vineyards lie was elevated from Cotes du Rhone Villages Cairanne to AOC Cairanne. In celebration of this change, Philippe decided he wanted all of his wines to showcase their place of origin. So he’s decided to rename the wine we’ve always called La Daurelle – named for Philippe’s home in Cairanne – as cuvee Saint Cecile after the village of Sainte Cécile les Vignes where the vineyard is located.

With the name change comes a change in blend, as the lower-quality Carignan and sometimes difficult to ripen Mourvedre are dropped in favor of Grenache (40%) and a much bigger dollop of Syrah (60%). Everything else remains the same. The wine ferments in tank at warm temperatures and stay on the skins and seeds for up to 20 days to ensure generous extraction of color, flavor and tannin.

Then, to balance the big extraction, the wine ages in one to five year-old French oak casks, all about twice the size of a typical Burgundy barrel (500 liters). Larger, older, barrels don’t add any oaky flavor to the wine. Instead, they allow a slow, steady, exposure to oxygen bleeding into the wine through the wood to soften a bit while gaining rich, meaty, complexity.

Meet Philippe
philippe plantevinPhilippe may not be the flashiest winemaker in the Rhone, and his domaine north of Chateauneuf-du-Pape is easily overlooked. But, while Philippe is a pretty quiet, even modest, guy, there’s plenty of intensity and passion for making great wine here too. Philippe’s family grew grapes and made a little wine in the vineyards around the Southern Rhone village of Cairanne but sold all their fruit and wine to the local coop. In 1993, the young Philippe decided he could do better.

He and his wife bought an 18th century coach house (now lovingly restored) and built a very traditional Rhone winery there – a little stainless steel, but mainly concrete tanks for fermentation and aging. Over time, he acquired vineyards in Cairanne itself, in the surrounding town of Visan, and also to the south in Vaucluse, just outside the Cotes du Rhone AOC.

Philippe is a practical grape farmer, making minimal use of chemical sprays, training his vines low to the ground, and accepting the low yields needed for fine wine making in his rocky vineyards. Old-vine Grenache makes up the backbone for all of Philippe’s reds, with low-yielding, small-berried, Syrah adding color, meaty notes, and black fruits. In the winery, things are very traditional – long fermentations (10-30 days) in steel and concrete with regular pump overs to extract color and structure.

The resulting wines are very fine from top to bottom, but Philippe is too picky to bottle everything he makes. Instead, every year, he chooses his favorite tanks of wine to bottle with his label and sells the rest to top Rhone negotiants like Guigal. If it has his label on it, it’s because the wine is very, very good.

A Great Harvest – Southern Rhone Vintage 2016
Philippe’s are the first important Southern Rhone reds we’re bringing you from vintage 2016 – but they will not be the last. In a season of very sunny, warm, dry days and bitingly cool nights, 2016 in the Southern Rhone promises to be one of the great, great harvests. Some early comments from critics give you a taste of what to expect:

“These are wines that combine immense power (and sometimes alcohol levels) with elegance, perhaps most similar to the reds from 2010 or 1990. It will be a vintage to buy and cellar.” – Wine Advocate Issue 233

“The 2016s are on another level. The wines are beautifully concentrated and structured – on par with 2010 – yet have a more open, sexy, voluptuous style due to the larger yields. The tannin quality is beautiful, the wines have notable freshness and purity, their alcohol is integrated, and quality is incredibly high across all the regions. This is truly an extraordinary vintage.” Jeb Dunnuck (former Wine Advocate critic)

We’ll be showcasing top 2016 Rhone reds as they arrive. Many will be great wines. None will be more exciting or better value than this set of releases from Philippe Plantevin.

 

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