Still the “Young” Paul D

Paul DirederThis marks the 11th consecutive vintage we’ve encouraged you to try the wines of “young” Paul Direder – and the only reason we get to keep on using the “young” descriptor is that when we first met and tasted with Paul, he was only 17 years-old!

Paul grew up in a farming family in Austria’s Wagram region, watching his grandfather work the fields of grapes, grains and vegetables from infancy. As Paul likes to say, his first word wasn’t “mama” but “Dador” – “tractor” – something that fascinated him as his grandfather worked the farm and took him to equipment shows.

At the ripe old age of 16, Paul persuaded his mother to co-sign a lease with him and began taking over his grandfather’s vineyards. No one in the family had ever made wine commercially, so Paul persuaded his Wagram neighbor (and family friend) Anton Bauer to let him work in the Bauer cellars and learn. And, though Bauer, he met importer Klaus Wittauer just before he bottled his second vintage of Paul D Grüner Veltliner.

Lip-smacking, Mouthwatering Fun
Paul D Gruner LabelWe first tasted that wine, the 2008 Paul D Grüner, in the summer of 2009 and were immediately impressed with the big flavors, generous texture, and the stunning value – a very attractive $8.99 retail price for a full 1.0 liter of lip-smacking, mouthwatering fun! At the time, Paul spoke almost no English, so it took us a bit to understand why he wasn’t tasting the wine with us – at 17 years-old, he wasn’t legal! We’ve carried the wine ever since, though, and never been disappointed.

Over the course of a couple of visits with Paul at his tidy, pocket-sized Wagram winery, his continued growth in skill, confidence, and production were all immediately clear. Yes, he’s still a bit boyish looking (he’d certainly be carded at our store!), bursting with youthful enthusiasm, and lets his mother, wife, and charming baby act as hosts to a visiting group. But he also clearly knows what he wants to do and how to do it.

The common thread you’ll find in all Paul D wines is frank, fresh, fruitiness married to fine crispness and plenty of flavor and length. If you want to pay attention to them, there’s more than enough going on to hold you interest, especially if you care about texture and finish.

But, like Paul himself, all are really about enthusiasm, joyfulness, and fun. Which is a lot to get from $8.98!  (This is a Carryout Case Special for the weekend of July 27-29, 2018. No email, web or phone orders at this case price through the weekend.)

Advertisements

A New AOC for France, and for Plantevin ‘La Daurelle’!

While we love all of Philippe Plantevin’s wines, his special Cotes du Rhone Villages “La Daurelle” cuvee has always been our favorite. But a continuation of Philippe’s skillful winegrowing and winemaking – plus some changes triggered by the elevation of Philippe’s Village of Cairanne to AOC status – come together this year to create the best “La Daurelle” ever!

As you may know, France’s Southern Rhone region has four levels of classification:

  • Cotes du Rhone – a wine from anywhere in the Cotes du Rhone region
  • Cotes du Rhone Villages – a wine from one of the 95 or so hamlets judged to be a cut above the average CdR vineyard land; “La Daurelle” is in this category
  • Cotes du Rhone Villages with Village Name – Like Philippe’s Cotes du Rhone Villages Visan, from one of the 22 or so villages judged to be better still and to have a unique character or style
  • AOC/AOP – A village that stands on its own as one of France’s great terriors; think Lirac, Vacqueyras, Gigondas and – most famous of all – Chateauneuf du Pape.

Elevation from Villages to AOC Means New Name for La Daurelle
plantevin-sainte-cecile-bottle.jpgIn vintage 2016, after years of evaluation and regulatory approvals, the village where Philippe’s home, winery and main vineyards lie was elevated from Cotes du Rhone Villages Cairanne to AOC Cairanne. In celebration of this change, Philippe decided he wanted all of his wines to showcase their place of origin. So he’s decided to rename the wine we’ve always called La Daurelle – named for Philippe’s home in Cairanne – as cuvee Saint Cecile after the village of Sainte Cécile les Vignes where the vineyard is located.

With the name change comes a change in blend, as the lower-quality Carignan and sometimes difficult to ripen Mourvedre are dropped in favor of Grenache (40%) and a much bigger dollop of Syrah (60%). Everything else remains the same. The wine ferments in tank at warm temperatures and stay on the skins and seeds for up to 20 days to ensure generous extraction of color, flavor and tannin.

Then, to balance the big extraction, the wine ages in one to five year-old French oak casks, all about twice the size of a typical Burgundy barrel (500 liters). Larger, older, barrels don’t add any oaky flavor to the wine. Instead, they allow a slow, steady, exposure to oxygen bleeding into the wine through the wood to soften a bit while gaining rich, meaty, complexity.

Meet Philippe
philippe plantevinPhilippe may not be the flashiest winemaker in the Rhone, and his domaine north of Chateauneuf-du-Pape is easily overlooked. But, while Philippe is a pretty quiet, even modest, guy, there’s plenty of intensity and passion for making great wine here too. Philippe’s family grew grapes and made a little wine in the vineyards around the Southern Rhone village of Cairanne but sold all their fruit and wine to the local coop. In 1993, the young Philippe decided he could do better.

He and his wife bought an 18th century coach house (now lovingly restored) and built a very traditional Rhone winery there – a little stainless steel, but mainly concrete tanks for fermentation and aging. Over time, he acquired vineyards in Cairanne itself, in the surrounding town of Visan, and also to the south in Vaucluse, just outside the Cotes du Rhone AOC.

Philippe is a practical grape farmer, making minimal use of chemical sprays, training his vines low to the ground, and accepting the low yields needed for fine wine making in his rocky vineyards. Old-vine Grenache makes up the backbone for all of Philippe’s reds, with low-yielding, small-berried, Syrah adding color, meaty notes, and black fruits. In the winery, things are very traditional – long fermentations (10-30 days) in steel and concrete with regular pump overs to extract color and structure.

The resulting wines are very fine from top to bottom, but Philippe is too picky to bottle everything he makes. Instead, every year, he chooses his favorite tanks of wine to bottle with his label and sells the rest to top Rhone negotiants like Guigal. If it has his label on it, it’s because the wine is very, very good.

A Great Harvest – Southern Rhone Vintage 2016
Philippe’s are the first important Southern Rhone reds we’re bringing you from vintage 2016 – but they will not be the last. In a season of very sunny, warm, dry days and bitingly cool nights, 2016 in the Southern Rhone promises to be one of the great, great harvests. Some early comments from critics give you a taste of what to expect:

“These are wines that combine immense power (and sometimes alcohol levels) with elegance, perhaps most similar to the reds from 2010 or 1990. It will be a vintage to buy and cellar.” – Wine Advocate Issue 233

“The 2016s are on another level. The wines are beautifully concentrated and structured – on par with 2010 – yet have a more open, sexy, voluptuous style due to the larger yields. The tannin quality is beautiful, the wines have notable freshness and purity, their alcohol is integrated, and quality is incredibly high across all the regions. This is truly an extraordinary vintage.” Jeb Dunnuck (former Wine Advocate critic)

We’ll be showcasing top 2016 Rhone reds as they arrive. Many will be great wines. None will be more exciting or better value than this set of releases from Philippe Plantevin.

 

Sangiovese from Montecucco – A wine to savor, share, enjoy!

Sassetti Petimali estate

As I sat sipping the 2015 Sassetti Montecucco with patriarch Livio Sassetti at his famed Petimali Brunello estate back in May, I knew how much you’d love this supple Sangiovese this summer. Just like Washington, DC, today, it was a hot, slightly muggy day that made the prospect of tasting even great Brunello (and Livio’s 2013 Brunello is great indeed – as you’ll see this fall!) a bit daunting.

Before the first Montalcino wine, though, the Montecucco La Querciolina sloshed into our glasses – and, suddenly, the whole group was revived. Aromas of dark strawberry, cherry, violets, leather and cinnamon spice wafted from each glass. And those captivating scents turned into brilliantly fresh and refreshing flavors on the palate. The wine was at once juicy-fresh and deeply flavored, and the fine, silky tannins pushed the finish to fantastic length.

Being lunchtime in Italy, everyone immediately reached out and started gobbling still more of antipasti in front of us. (A mixed blessing, as we thought we were having a light lunch and weren’t aware that a glorious rice dish and Tuscan T-Bone steak were still to come!). No professional spitting here – this was a wine to be savored, shared, enjoyed.

sassetti montecucco bottle and glass summerAnd “savor, share, enjoy” is what Livio Sassetti’s son, Lorenzo, intends his Montecucco to be all about. Lorenzo is principal winemaker at the family’s famed Pertimali Brunello estate (although Livio remains very much involved!) where he makes some of Montalcino’s most exciting, classically-styled Sangiovese Grosso. But he and Livio purchased land in nearby Montecucco in 1999 to make a wine that was all about this fast emerging region’s unique character – and unique style of Sangiovese.

The Sassetti winemaking family is famous, with deep roots in Montalcino as co-founders of the Consorzio del Brunello di Montalcino, and one of the early producers of Brunello. Montecucco – a region that’s fun to say if still a bit obscure –  sits just west of Montalcino in a region.  The vines here are the same as in Montalcino, the large-berried clone known as Sangiovese Grosso. But in Montecucco, there’s more clay and mineral content in the soil than in Montalcino (courtesy of the nearby extinct volcano Monte Amiata). The minerality and larger day/night temperature swings bring out Sangiovese’s bright cherry fruit and floral notes while allowing tannins to ripen to silky smoothness.

Lorenzo gives this just six months in large Slavonian oak casks and then a bit of bottle age before release. Which locks in the super juicy, fresh fruit and allows the fresh violet, savory leather, and cinnamon spice notes to shine through.

With a light chill now, Sassetti Montecucco La Querciolina 2015 delivers a gloriously refreshing jolt of fresh cherry and cranberry juice fruit that will refresh and revive you on a warm summer’s day. By this winter, it will have taken on weight and power (without losing the smooth finish) and be ready for steaks and stews. At these special savings prices, you’ll want to stock up on enough to enjoy all year long.

Come by Friday and Saturday, July 14 and 15,  and taste for yourself. Then pick up some antipasti on the way home and get ready for a festive feast.

Rioja Modern and Traditional

Juan escudero VinsacroJuan Escudero began making Rioja wine in a small cave carved out of a hillside in 1852, well before the French invasion. The family continued winemaking and growing through the years, with Juan’s grandson, Benito, moving into Cava production in the 1950s. His children returned to Rioja and under the leadership of Bordeaux-trained brother Amador founded Bodegas Vinsacro around the turn of this century.

They planted about 30 acres of vines in Rioja Baja in 1996, but the key to the success of this very modern winery was a small, very old, and very, very, old-fashioned vineyard owned by the family for 120 years. It’s called Cuesta la Reina and it was planted around 1945 (70 years ago) on the stony southern slope of Mount Yerga between 450 and 800 meters elevation.

An Old-Fashioned Vineyard
Vinsacro harvestAs was customary at the time, the vineyard was planted by taking cuttings of another old vineyard and grafting the canes onto new rootstocks – a process called massal selection. And, as was customary in Rioja for centuries before the current modern revolution, that old vineyard was planted to a mixture of vine types including Garnacha (perhaps half the vineyard) plus Tempranillo, Graciano, Monastrell and Bobal.

As in 17th and 18th Century Bordeaux, this blend of grapes was less about achieving the perfect blend in the finished wine than about insurance: if growing conditions caused problems with one varietal, there was at least a chance that the others would ripen. When it was time to harvest, the whole vineyard was picked at once and the wine’s final blend was whatever happened to come off the vines. In fact, the traditional name for this style vineyard, “Vidau,” means “ready to pick.”

Modern Quality and Care
vinsacro-grapesAmador and his brothers cherished this old vineyard, but also began applying some modern farming ideas. First, they converted to completely organic farming to help the soil regain its health and keep the old vines thriving. Then, they began to pick each varietal separately as they ripened fully. Tempranillo gets picked first, usually in the first week of October. Then Garnacha comes in late October before Graciano in early November and then, last, Mazuelo and Bobal.

As if four separate harvests weren’t expensive enough, the grapes are sorted twice, once in the vineyard and then on a vibrating table in the winery before they go into the vats. After fermenting separately, each varietal ages for 12-14 months in 100% new French oak casks to both soften tannins and add a touch of spice without losing fruit or adding harsher American oak influence.

Finally, Amador creates the decidedly old-fashioned Rioja blend that will become Dioro. About 50% of the final wine is Tempranillo – compared to 80-100% at most “modernist” estates. About 20% is Garnacha (for hints of red raspberry) and 10% each Mazuelo and Graciano (for vivid acids and cherry fruit). Monastrell (earthy) and Bobal (licorice and plum) make up the rest of the blend. Only the very best barrels of wine from Cuesta la Reina go into Dioro, with the rest of the vineyard’s wine being blended into other bottlings.

vinsacro-riojaFrom organic farming to multiple harvest passes, double sorting, new French oak aging, and strict selection of only the best lots, this is an expensive way to make wine. Which is why Wine Advocate gave the 2015 such high praise (92 points) even at a curiously high reported $65 release price.

At the $24.99 regular price, Vinsacro Rioja Dioro 2015 is outstanding value in rich, ripe, powerful Rioja. At our $14.98 best price this week, it’s a better deal still. And when you take an extra $10 off just for signing up for our new website and ordering online? Well, that’s a superb stock-up opportunity on a classy, delicious, red you’ll enjoy for years.