‘Barolo Girl’ is Born

Giulia Negri BarologirlGiulia Negri’s family have been growing Nebbiolo and making Barolo at their Serrandenari estate for about 150 years. Their La Morra vineyards are the highest up in all of Barolo, ranging from 380-500 meters in altitude. The cool climate and sandy La Morra soils give elegant, pure, wines here, and they’ve long been a favorite of Barolo fans who value sophistication and grace over pure power and weight.

Giulia grew up in the winery and vineyards and seemed destined to join Serrandenari herself. But, she as she watched many of her slightly older friends establish their own, small, projects, often working in tiny cellars or their own parents’ garages, she developed an itch to strike out on her own.

So, in here early 20s, and with her parents’ support, Giulia founded her own “Garage” winery. She set up shop in a modest shed with simple winemaking equipment. She knew she wanted to honor her family’s traditions, so she took charge of Nebbiolo vines growing on the lower portion of the Serrandenari estate and a small, east-facing sliver of the famous Brunate vineyard. And, to make her own mark, she planted Chardonnay and Pinot Noir on sites too cool for Nebbiolo.

From Barolo to Burgundy to Us. One of the most important trends in Barolo over the past 20 years is young winemakers exploring the world of wine beyond Piemonte – beyond Italy itself. And, having seen her friends do that, Giulia sought out experiences, expertise, and advice from the best non-Italian winemakers she could find. Searching for advice to make rich, powerful, but pure and site-specific Pinot Noir and how to meld this temperamental wine with wood, she called on one of the greatest Pinot Noir winemakers we know: Jean-Michel Guillon in Burgundy’s Gevrey Chambertin.

Jean-Michel was delighted to help this budding winemaker, and hosted Giulia at his Burgundy domaine for hours of tasting, talking, and training on Pinot Noir winemaking, especially on the selection of the best barrels that deliver all the benefits of fine French oak – softening, fixing color, adding complexity – without overwhelming fruit or sense of place. He was impressed by her talent and passion – and by the wines she brought along for him to taste. Recognizing the almost Burgundian style of her Barolo and learning of her very limited representation in the US, Jean-Michel introduced Giulia to his good friends and US importers, Jonas Gustafsson and Olivier Daubresse.

As Jonas and Olivier would be the first to say, the very last thing either was looking for was an Italian wine to add to their portfolios. Olivier specializes in French wines from the Rhone, Provence, and – especially, Burgundy. And Jonas is the master of rich, powerful, authentic wines from Spain and Portugal. Italy simply wasn’t in the cards.

But, after first tasted her wines and then meeting with Giulia, they simply could not resist bringing her beautiful wines to us here in the mid-Atlantic region. And, knowing our passion for fine Barolo, especially Barolo that tempers it’s power and depth with a sense of elegance and fine style, Jonas and Olivier were kind enough to bring Giulia’s wines to us.

Giula Negri the Future‘Barolo. The Future.’  I strongly encourage you to visit Giulia’s website to see pictures of her, the tiny winery, the beautiful Barolo scenery, and her dog (clearly important to Giulia, as he takes center stage on the wine label!). The wine is as charming and pretty and the pictures you’ll see there!

While Giulia is innovating with Piemonte Chardonnay and Pinot Noir (and we hope to have the chance to taste those sometime soon!), her Barolo is all about very precise and well-executed tradition. Her Nebbiolo is sustainably grown on legendary sites – the high-altitude La Mora vineyard of Serradenari and the famous Cru of Brunate. She and her team of 3 – only four people total at this project! – harvest the grapes at perfect ripeness and bring them cool to her tiny, garage-like cellar.

After careful destemming – a key part of making great Barolo! – the grapes are crushed and then allowed to ferment in large wood vats. The must spends a total of 45 days in vat, with the cap submerged for 30 days and allowed to float gently on top for an additional 15. The challenge in making Barolo is to get plenty of color and flavor complexity from Nebbiolo’s skins without extracting hard, bitter, tannins. The combination of gentle (if largely traditional) maceration and perfectly ripe grapes delivers perfect balance in Giulia’s wine.

After fermentation, the wine is aged for three years in equal parts 500 liter Tonneaux and 250 litter Barriques. Both are 100% French oak (and very high-end French oak at that!), but none of the barrels are new. The mixture of fairly small (for Barolo) casks and absence of new oak allows Giulia’s Barolo to retain color, soften, and gain wonderful complexity without overt wood aromas and flavors.

Like many of her friends’ wines, Giulia’s Barolo benefits from all that winemakers have learned about capturing all of Nebbiolo’s complex aromas, rich flavors, and deep power without the hard tannins that used to require 20 years to resolve. But, unlike most of the “garagiste” Barolo we’ve tried, the 2010 Barolo La Tartufaia avoids an overt sense of winemaking – no black-as-night color, no thickness to the texture, and no intense vanilla/chocolate flavors of wood.

As Giulia writes on the “Barolo Girl” portion of her website, “Now that the Barolo Boys have grown up, time may have come for us, the Barolo Girls.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s